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Combined Honours in Gerontology and Health Studies (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Combined Honours in Gerontology and Another Subject (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Combined Honours in Health Studies and Another Subject (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Health Studies (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Minor in Health, Aging and Society (Minor)Degree Details

Length:
Minor may be declared when completing convocation information
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Minor in Mental Health, Addiction and Society (Minor)Degree Details

Length:
Minor may be declared when completing convocation information
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Bachelor of Arts in Health, Aging and Society (B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
3 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.5 (C-) and an average of at least 4.0 (C-) in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Master of Arts in Health & Aging (M.A.)Degree Details

Length:
1 year: Course Work plus Major Research Paper OR 2 years: Course Work plus Thesis
Required Credential:
Honours Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in a related field
Program Type:
Course Work plus Major Research Paper; Course Work plus Thesis
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Studies (Ph.D.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Master’s degree in a related health and/or social sciences discipline
Program Type:
Doctoral
Program Options:
Full-time

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Gerontology (Ph.D.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Master’s degree in a related aging and/or social sciences discipline
Program Type:
Doctoral
Program Options:
Full-time

Hons.B.A.Combined Honours in Gerontology and Health Studies

Students will graduate with a double major and because much of the Gerontology and Health Studies curriculum is common, will still have the flexibility to take many interesting electives or use elective units towards the completion of a minor and/or one of three certificates (1. Applied Behaviour Analysis 2. Business Studies 3. Leadership and Management in the Not for Profit Sector)

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work 

Notes

  1. Students are strongly encouraged to complete HLTHAGE 2A03 and 3B03 or 3G03 to satisfy the Research Methods requirement of the degree, but may complete the Research Methods course(s) as required by the other subject and replace these with equal units of Health, Aging and Society or Course List courses. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.
  2. Students with prior credit in GERONTOL or HEALTHST courses may consult the Health, Aging and Society Administrator to determine eligibility toward degree requirements.
  3. Students may take a maximum of 15 units from GERONTOL Level IV and HEALTHST Level IV course lists. Please refer to "Requirements and Timelines" (below) for more details.

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

 

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.
    (See Admission above.)

 

12 units

  • HLTHAGE 2B03 - Social Identity, Health and Illness
  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2D03 - Continuum of Care
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

 

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3AA3 - State, Civil Society and Health
  • HLTHAGE 3L03 - Embodied Aging

 

3 units from either

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

 

3 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

 

3 units from either

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

 

9 units

  • Health, Aging and Society Course List

 

3 units

  • SOCSCI 2J03 - Introduction to Statistics

 

6 units

from Level IV Gerontology Course List:

  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4H03 - History and Culture of Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4L03 - Social Policy and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4P03 - Recreation and Leisure in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis 

 

6 units

from Level IV Health Studies Course List:

  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4D03 - Health in Cross-Cultural and International Perspectives
  • HLTHAGE 4F03 - Selected Issues in the Social Aspects of Health
  • HLTHAGE 4G03 - Global Health
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4J03 - Narratives of Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4Q03 - Representations of Mental Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4S03 - Health and the Unfairly Structured City
  • HLTHAGE 4T03 - Gender and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis

3 additional units

from either Level IV Gerontology or Level IV Health Studies Course Lists

36 units

  • Electives

Students start in the Social Sciences Level 1 program and apply to the Program at the end of their first year. Students must complete the requirements of a Level 1 program including two Level 1 Labour Studies courses.

Enrolment in this Academic Plan is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3

Any student seeking admission to a Level 2 program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level 2 through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application).

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

    The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

    The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship The Susan Farley Scholarship The Wouters Family Scholarship

 

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA) 

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 2AN3 - The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
  • ANTHROP 2C03 - Archaeology of Environmental Crisis and Response
  • ANTHROP 2FF3 - Human Skeletal Biology and Bioarchaeology
  • ANTHROP 2U03 - Plagues and People
  • ANTHROP 3C03 - Health and Environment: Anthropological Approaches
  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 - Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • ANTHROP 4S03 - The Anthropology of Infectious Disease
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 2HI3 - Geographies of Death and Disease
  • GEOG 3HH3 - Geography of Health and Health Care
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • GEOG 4HH3 - Environment and Health
  • HISTORY 2EH3 - The Social History of Cancer
  • HISTORY 3CP3 - The Citizen-Patient: A Modern History of Public Health, 1700-Present
  • HTHSCI 2G03 - Epidemiology
  • INDIGST 3H03 - Indigenous Medicine I - Philosophy
  • INDIGST 3HH3 - Indigenous Medicine II - Practical
  • KINESIOL 3A03 - History of Exercise and Sports Medicine
  • KINESIOL 3S03 - Somatics
  • KINESIOL 3SS3 - Body, Mind, Spirit
  • LABRST 3D03 - Work: Dangerous to your Health?
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • PSYCH 2AP3 - Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals and Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3B03 - Special Populations
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Moral Issues
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: the Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
  • SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4G03 - Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Health and Illness
2017/2018 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September

Hons.B.A.Combined Honours in Gerontology and Another Subject

This degree program brings a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging. Designed to foster an understanding of aging issues within and across different contexts, issues ranging from the individual experience of the aging process to the societal complexities of an aging population are examined both within the Canadian context and more broadly.

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work

Notes

  1. See Admission to Level II Programs in Academic Regulations in this section of the Calendar.
  2. Students are strongly encouraged to complete HLTHAGE 2A03 and 3B03 or 3G03 to satisfy the Research Methods requirement of the degree, but may complete the Research Methods course(s) as required by the other subject and replace these with equal units of Health, Aging and Society or Course List courses. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.
  3. Students with prior credit in GERONTOL or HEALTHST courses may consult the Health, Aging and Society Administrator to determine eligibility toward degree requirements.
  4. Students may take a maximum of 9 units from HLTHAGE 4A03, 4B03, 4C03, 4H03, 4I03, 4L03, 4N03, 4P03, 4Z06 A/B.

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

9 units

  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2D03 - Continuum of Care
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3L03 - Embodied Aging

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience 
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry or
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

(See Note 2 above)

 

3-6 units

  • SOCSCI 2J03 - Introduction to Statistics
    In combined programs within the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Research Methods/Statistics requirement specified for the other subject

 

9 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 4A03 - Communication and Counselling with Older Adults
  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4H03 - History and Culture of Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4L03 - Social Policy and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4P03 - Leisure and Recreation in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis

(See Note 4 above)

6 units

from

  • Course List or Health, Aging and Society

36 units

from

  • Courses specified for the other subject

12-15 units

  • Electives

Students start in the Social Sciences Level 1 program and apply to the Program at the end of their first year. Students must complete the requirements of a Level 1 program.

Enrolment in this program is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level I program with a minimum Grade Point Average of 5.0 including credit in HLTHAGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least C in HLTHAGE 1BB3.

Any student seeking admission to a Level II program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level II through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application) no later than April 28.

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

  • The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award
  • The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology
  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize
  • The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes
  • The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship
  • The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship
  • The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship
  • The Susan Farley Scholarship
  • The Wouters Family Scholarship

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA).

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 2HI3 - Geographies of Health
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: the Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work and Social Justice
  • SOCIOL 3CC3 - Sociology of the Family and the Life Cycle
  • SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
2017/2018 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September

Hons.B.A.Combined Honours in Health Studies and Another Subject

This degree program focuses on the significance of health and illness in cultural context. The perspectives of the social sciences and humanities are brought to bear on exploring the diverse meanings and practices associated with health and health care. Attention is given to different theoretical approaches to understanding the health of individuals, groups and communities in contemporary and historical perspectives.

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work

Notes

  1. See Admission to Level II Programs in Academic Regulations in this section of the Calendar.
  2. Students are strongly encouraged to complete HLTHAGE 2A03 and 3B03 or 3G03 to satisfy the Research Methods requirement of the degree, but may complete the Research Methods course(s) as required by the other subject and replace these with equal units of Health, Aging and Society or Course List courses. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.
  3. Students with prior credit in GERONTOL or HEALTHST courses may consult the Health, Aging and Society Administrator to determine eligibility toward degree requirements.
  4. Students may take a maximum of 9 units from HLTHAGE 4B03, 4C03, 4D03, 4F03, 4G03, 4I03, 4J03, 4N03, 4O03, 4Q03, 4R03, 4S03, 4T03, 4Z06 A/B.

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

9 units

  • HLTHAGE 2B03 - Social Identity, Health and Illness
  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3AA3 - State, Civil Society and Health

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience 
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry or
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

(See Note 2 above)

3-6 units

  • SOCSCI 2J03 - Introduction to Statistics
    In combined programs within the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Research Methods/Statistics requirement specified for the other subject



9 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4D03 - Health in Cross-Cultural and International Perspectives
  • HLTHAGE 4F03 - Selected Issues in the Social Aspects of Health
  • HLTHAGE 4G03 - Global Health
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4J03 - Narratives of Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4O03 - Soundscapes of Wellbeing in Popular Music
  • HLTHAGE 4Q03 - Representations of Mental Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4R03 - Beyond the Social: Determinants of Indigenous People's Health
  • HLTHAGE 4S03 - Health and the Unfairly Structured City
  • HLTHAGE 4T03 - Gender and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis

(See Note 4 above)

6 units

from

  • Course List or Health, Aging and Society

36 units

from

  • Courses specified for the other subject

12-15 units

  • Electives

Enrolment in this Academic Plan is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.

Any student seeking admission to a Level II program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level II through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application) no later than April 28.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

  • The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award
  • The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology
  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize
  • The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes
  • The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship
  • The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship
  • The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship
  • The Susan Farley Scholarship
  • The Wouters Family Scholarship

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA)

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 2AN3 - The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
  • ANTHROP 2C03 - Archaeology of Environmental Crisis and Response
  • ANTHROP 2FF3 - Human Skeletal Biology and Bioarchaeology 
  • ANTHROP 2U03 - Plagues and People
  • ANTHROP 3C03 - Health and Environment: Anthropological Approaches
  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 - Aboriginal Community Health Well-being
  • ANTHROP 4S03 - The Anthropology of Infectious Disease
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 2HI3 - Geographies of Health
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • GEOG 4HH3 - Environment and Health
  • HISTORY 2EH3
  • HISTORY 3CP3 - The Citizen-Patient: A Modern History of Public Health, 1700-Present
  • HLTHSCI 2G03 - Epidemiology
  • INDIGST 3H03 - Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • INDIGST 3HH3 - Indigenous Medicine II: Practical
  • KINESIOL 3A03 - History of Exercise and Sports Medicine
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • LABRST 3D03 - Work: Dangerous to Your Health?
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • PSYCH 2AP3 - Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals and Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3B03 - Special Populations
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: The Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4G03 - Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work and Sexualities

 

2016/2017 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
Spring

Hons.B.A.Honours Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology

This degree program brings a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging. Designed to foster an understanding of aging issues within and across different contexts, issues ranging from the individual experience of the aging process to the societal complexities of an aging population are examined both within the Canadian context and more broadly.

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work 

Notes

  1. See Admission to Level II Programs in Academic Regulations in this section of the Calendar.
  2. Courses other than those listed below in the Course List may be substituted with the prior permission of the Chair. Students wishing to apply for substitutions must contact the Health, Aging and Society Administrator. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.
  3. Students who have completed HLTH AGE 2A06 or 3Z06 (or equivalent – see course antirequisites) are not required to complete HLTHAGE 2A03 or 3B03 or 3G03.
  4. Students with prior credit in GERONTOL or HEALTHST courses may consult the Health, Aging and Society Administrator to determine eligibility toward degree requirements.
  5. Students may take a maximum of 9 units from HLTHAGE 4A03, 4B03, 4C03, 4H03, 4I03, 4L03, 4N03, 4P03, 4Z06 A/B.

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

9 units

  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2D03 - Continuum of Care
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3L03 - Embodied Aging

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience 
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry or
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

(See Note 3 above)

 

3 units

  • SOCSCI 2J03 - Introduction to Statistics

15 units

from

  • Course List or Health, Aging and Society

9 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 4A03 - Communication and Counselling with Older Adults
  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4H03 - History and Culture of Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4L03 - Social Policy and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4P03 - Leisure and Recreation in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis

(See Note 5 above)

42 units

  • Electives, of which at least six units must be taken from outside of Health, Aging & Society

Students start in the Social Sciences Level 1 program and apply to the Program at the end of their first year. Students must complete the requirements of a Level 1 program.

Enrolment in this program is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level I program with a minimum Grade Point Average of 5.0 including credit in HLTHAGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least C in HLTHAGE 1BB3.

Any student seeking admission to a Level II program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level II through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application) no later than April 28.

 

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

  • The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award
  • The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology
  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize
  • The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes
  • The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship
  • The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship
  • The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship
  • The Susan Farley Scholarship
  • The Wouters Family Scholarship

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA).

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 2HI3 - Geographies of Health
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: the Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work and Social Justice
  • SOCIOL 3CC3 - Sociology of the Family and the Life Cycle
  • SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
2017/2018 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September

Hons.B.A.Honours Bachelor of Arts in Health Studies

This degree program focuses on the significance of health and illness in cultural context. The perspectives of the social sciences and humanities are brought to bear on exploring the diverse meanings and practices associated with health and health care. Attention is given to different theoretical approaches to understanding the health of individuals, groups and communities in contemporary and historical perspectives.

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work

Notes

  1. See Admission to Level II Programs in Academic Regulations in this section of the Calendar.
  2. Courses other than those listed below in the Course List may be substituted with the prior permission of the Chair. Students wishing to apply for substitutions must contact the Health, Aging and Society Administrator. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.
  3. Students who have completed HLTH AGE 2A06 or 3Z06 (or equivalent – see course antirequisites) are not required to complete HLTHAGE 2A03 or 3B03 or 3G03.
  4. Students with prior credit in GERONTOL or HEALTHST courses may consult the Health, Aging and Society Administrator to determine eligibility toward degree requirements.
  5. Students may take a maximum of 9 units from HLTHAGE 4B03, 4C03, 4D03, 4F03, 4G03, 4I03, 4J03, 4N03, 4O03, 4Q03, 4R03, 4S03, 4T03, 4Z06 A/B.

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

9 units

  • HLTHAGE 2B03 - Social Identity, Health and Illness
  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3L03 - State, Civil Society and Health

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience 
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

and one of

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry or
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

(See Note 3 above)

3 units

  • SOCSCI 2J03 - Introduction to Statistics

15 units

from

  • Course List or Health, Aging and Society

9 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 4B03 - Death and Dying in Later Life
  • HLTHAGE 4C03 - Representations of Health and Illness Across the Lifecourse
  • HLTHAGE 4D03 - Health in Cross-Cultural and International Perspectives
  • HLTHAGE 4F03 - Selected Issues in the Social Aspects of Health
  • HLTHAGE 4G03 - Global Health
  • HLTHAGE 4I03 - Aging and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4J03 - Narratives of Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4N03 - Aging and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4O03 - Soundscapes of Wellbeing in Popular Music
  • HLTHAGE 4Q03 - Representations of Mental Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4R03 - Beyond the Social: Determinants of Indigenous People's Health
  • HLTHAGE 4S03 - Health and the Unfairly Structured City
  • HLTHAGE 4T03 - Gender and Health
  • HLTHAGE 4Z06 A/B - Health, Aging and Society Thesis

(See Note 5 above)

42 units

  • Electives, of which at least six units must be taken from outside of Health, Aging & Society

Enrolment in this Academic Plan is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.

Any student seeking admission to a Level II program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level II through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application) no later than April 28.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

  • The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award
  • The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology
  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize
  • The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes
  • The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship
  • The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship
  • The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship
  • The Susan Farley Scholarship
  • The Wouters Family Scholarship

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA)

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 2AN3 - The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
  • ANTHROP 2C03 - Archaeology of Environmental Crisis and Response
  • ANTHROP 2FF3 - Human Skeletal Biology and Bioarchaeology 
  • ANTHROP 2U03 - Plagues and People
  • ANTHROP 3C03 - Health and Environment: Anthropological Approaches
  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 - Aboriginal Community Health Well-being
  • ANTHROP 4S03 - The Anthropology of Infectious Disease
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 2HI3 - Geographies of Health
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • GEOG 4HH3 - Environment and Health
  • HISTORY 2EH3
  • HISTORY 3CP3 - The Citizen-Patient: A Modern History of Public Health, 1700-Present
  • HLTHSCI 2G03 - Epidemiology
  • INDIGST 3H03 - Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • INDIGST 3HH3 - Indigenous Medicine II: Practical
  • KINESIOL 3A03 - History of Exercise and Sports Medicine
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • LABRST 3D03 - Work: Dangerous to Your Health?
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • PSYCH 2AP3 - Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals and Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3B03 - Special Populations
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: The Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4G03 - Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
2016/2017 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 (C) including credit in HLTH AGE 1BB3 and a grade of at least 5.0 (C) in HLTH AGE 1AA3.
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
Spring

MinorMinor in Health, Aging and Society

Notes

  1. Students are responsible for ensuring that course prerequisites are fulfilled.
  2. KINESIOL 2G03 and 3A03 may be used to satisfy Health, Aging and Society requirements for Kinesiology students pursuing a Minor in Health, Aging and Society.
  3. Students who have completed GERONTOL and/or HEALTHST courses may count these towards a minor in Health, Aging and Society. Given the extensive curriculum revisions that have been made, students are strongly encouraged to review the course antirequisites in the Course Listings section of the Calendar.

24 units total

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 1AA3 - Introduction to Mental Health and Illness
  • HLTHAGE 1BB3 - Aging and Society 

18 units 

from

  • Course List or Health, Aging and Society

Course List

  • ANTHROP 2AN3 – The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
  • ANTHROP 2U03 – Plagues and People
  • ANTHROP 3C03 - Health and Environment: Anthropological Approaches
  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 - Aboriginal Community Health and Well-being
  • ANTHROP 4S03 - The Anthropology of Infectious Diseases
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 3Q03 – Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • GEOG 4HH3 - Environment and Health
  • HLTHSCI 2G03 - Epidemiology
  • HLTHSCI 2J03 - Health, Attitude and Behaviour
  • INDIGST 3H03 – Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • INDIGST 3HH3 - Indigenous Medicine II: Practical
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • KINESIOL 4SS3 - Human Aging: Biological and Lifestyle Influences
  • LABRST 3D03 - Work: Dangerous to Your Health?
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • PEACEST 2D03
  • PSYCH 2AP3 – Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals & Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3B03 – Special Populations
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: The Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCIOL 3CC3 – Sociology of the Family and Life Cycle
  • SOCIOL 3G03 – Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 – Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4G03 – Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
  • SOCWORK 3S03 - Social Work, Disability and Dis/Ableism
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work and Social Justice 
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction: Social, Political and Historical Perspectives from Mad Studies and Critical Disability Studies for Social Work

Completion of Level 1 + 24 units

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

The department of Health, Aging & Society provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 2AN3 – The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
  • ANTHROP 2U03 – Plagues and People
  • ANTHROP 3C03 - Health and Environment: Anthropological Approaches
  • ANTHROP 3HI3 - The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 - Aboriginal Community Health and Well-being
  • ANTHROP 4S03 - The Anthropology of Infectious Diseases
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 3Q03 – Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • GEOG 3HH3
  • GEOG 3HP3 - Population Growth and Aging
  • GEOG 4HH3 - Environment and Health
  • HLTHSCI 2G03 - Epidemiology
  • HLTHSCI 2J03 - Health, Attitude and Behaviour
  • INDIGST 3H03 – Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • INDIGST 3HH3 - Indigenous Medicine II: Practical
  • KINESIOL 3S03
  • KINESIOL 3SS3
  • KINESIOL 4SS3 - Human Aging: Biological and Lifestyle Influences
  • LABRST 3D03 - Work: Dangerous to Your Health?
  • PHILOS 2D03 - Bioethics
  • PHILOS 3C03 - Advanced Bioethics
  • PEACEST 2D03
  • PSYCH 2AP3 – Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals & Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3B03 – Special Populations
  • RELIGST 2C03 - Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2M03 - Death and Dying: Comparative Views
  • RELIGST 2N03 - Death and Dying: The Western Experience
  • RELIGST 2WW3 - Health, Healing and Religion
  • SOCIOL 3CC3 – Sociology of the Family and Life Cycle
  • SOCIOL 3G03 – Sociology of Health Care
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 – Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4G03 – Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
  • SOCWORK 3S03 - Social Work, Disability and Dis/Ableism
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work and Social Justice 
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction: Social, Political and Historical Perspectives from Mad Studies and Critical Disability Studies for Social Work
For more information:
Department of Health, Aging & Society
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27961
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
Minor may be declared when completing convocation information
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
January, September
Current Deadline:
April

MinorMinor in Mental Health, Addiction and Society

New for 2017/2018!  The minor in Mental Health and Addiction provides students with opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the relationship between mental health, addiction, and society. It involves examining the links between mental health and wider social processes, including marginalization, the construction of deviance, and the social determinants of health. Students will also gain a solid understanding of mental illness and some of the ways in which social change and other non-biomedical interventions can be harnessed to address issues related to mental health and addiction and promote well-being.

Notes

  1. Students are responsible for ensuring that course prerequisites are fulfilled.
  2. Those students who completed HLTHAGE 2G03 prior to Spring 2016 can use these 3 units towards the fulfillment of HLTHAGE 1CC3. Those students who completed HLTHAGE 2G03 between June 2016 and August 2017 can use these 3 units towards the fulfillment of HLTHAGE 2GG3.

24 units total

3 units from

  • HLTH AGE 1CC3 – Introduction to Mental Health and Illness

(See Note 2 above)

3 units from

  • HLTH AGE 1AA3 – Introduction to Health Studies
  • HLTH AGE 1BB3 - Aging and Society
  • SOCWORK 1AA3 - So You Think You Can Help? Introduction to Social Work I
  • SOCWORK 1BB3 -  Reimagining Help: Introduction to Social Work II
  • SOCIOL 1C03 - Canadian Society: Social Problems, Social Policy, and the Law
  • SOCPSY 1Z03 – An Introduction to Social Psychology

3 units from

  • HLTH AGE 2GG3 – Mental Health and Society

(See Note 2 above)

15 units from Course List

  • ANTHROP 3HI3 – The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • ECON 2Q03 – Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • HLTHAGE 2L03 - Drugs, Sex and Alcohol: Society and its Addictions
  • HLTHAGE 3D03 – Perspectives on Disability, Chronic Illness, and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 3N03 – Aging and Mental Health
  • HLTHAGE 3R03 – Health Inequalities
  • HLTHAGE 3YY3 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4J03 – Narratives of Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4Q03 – Representations of Mental Health and Illness3
  • INDIGST 2F03 – Residential Schools in Canada
  • INDIGST 3H03 – Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • POLSCI 2C03 – Force and Fear, Crime and Punishment 
  • PSYCH 2AP3 – Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals & Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3BA3 – Positive Psychology
  • SOCIOL 2BB3 – Sociology of Deviance
  • SOCIOL 2CC3 – Constructing Deviance
  • SOCIOL 3GG3 – Special Topics in the Sociology of Deviance
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 – Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4GG3 – Sexual Deviance
  • SOCPSY 3ZZ3 - Complex Problems from a Multidisciplinary Social Psychology Perspective
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction: Social, Political and Historical Perspectives from Mad Studies and Critical Disability Studies for Social Work

Completion of Level 1 + 24 units

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

The department of Health, Aging & Society provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Course List

  • ANTHROP 3HI3 – The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Healing
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • ECON 2Q03 – Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • HLTHAGE 2L03 - Drugs, Sex and Alcohol: Society and its Addictions
  • HLTHAGE 3D03 – Perspectives on Disability, Chronic Illness, and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 3N03 – Aging and Mental Health
  • HLTHAGE 3R03 – Health Inequalities
  • HLTHAGE 3YY3 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • HLTHAGE 4J03 – Narratives of Illness
  • HLTHAGE 4Q03 – Representations of Mental Health and Illness3
  • INDIGST 2F03 – Residential Schools in Canada
  • INDIGST 3H03 – Indigenous Medicine I: Philosophy
  • POLSCI 2C03 – Force and Fear, Crime and Punishment 
  • PSYCH 2AP3 – Abnormal Psychology: Fundamentals & Major Disorders
  • PSYCH 3BA3 – Positive Psychology
  • SOCIOL 2BB3 – Sociology of Deviance
  • SOCIOL 2CC3 – Constructing Deviance
  • SOCIOL 3GG3 – Special Topics in the Sociology of Deviance
  • SOCIOL 3HH3 – Sociology of Health
  • SOCIOL 4GG3 – Sexual Deviance
  • SOCPSY 3ZZ3 - Complex Problems from a Multidisciplinary Social Psychology Perspective
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction: Social, Political and Historical Perspectives from Mad Studies and Critical Disability Studies for Social Work
For more information:
Department of Health, Aging & Society
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27961
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
Minor may be declared when completing convocation information
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
January, September
Current Deadline:
April

B.A.Bachelor of Arts in Health, Aging and Society

Health and aging issues have become more complex, more important, and more challenging for individuals, institutions, and societies around the world. With the number and proportion of older people increasing, individuals, institutions, and societies face new opportunities and new challenges in a number of areas, including family dynamics, social relationships, work and retirement, health and health care, and the social and cultural experience of aging.

Graduates have been successful at finding careers in a range of health and/or aging fields, such as:

  • Health Policy/Social Policy Research
  • Project Coordinators
  • Care Coordinators
  • Volunteer Coordinators
  • Education Coordinators (i.e. Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource
  • Administration Education
  • Recreation/Activation staff in Long-term care
  • Law
  • Public Health
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Medicine Chiropractic School
  • Social Work

Notes

  1. See Admission to Level II Programs in Academic Regulations in this section of the Calendar.
  2. Students who completed HLTHAGE 2A06, 3A03 or 3Z06 or equivalent are not required to complete HLTHAGE 2A03.

Requires completion of 90 units (Levels I to III), of which 42 may be level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

15 units

  • HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I
  • HLTHAGE 2B03 - Social Identity, Health and Illness
  • HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology
  • HLTHAGE 2D03 - Continuum of Care
  • HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

6 units

  • HLTHAGE 3AA3 - State, Civil Society and Health
  • HLTHAGE 3L03 - Embodied Aging

3 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry
  • HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

3 units

from

  • HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience
  • HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

33 units

  • Electives, of which at least six units must be taken from outside Health, Aging and Society
 

 

Enrolment in this Academic Plan is limited and possession of the published minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Selection is based on academic achievement but requires, as a minimum, completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.5 (C-) and an average of at least 4.0 (C-) in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and 1BB3

Any student seeking admission to a Level II program in the Faculty of Social Sciences for the following Fall/Winter session must submit an Application for Admission to Level 2 through the Mosaic Student Centre (“My Academics”; Program/Plan Selection application) no later than April 28.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Some awards of interest:

  • The Barbara and Ronald Bayne Gerontology Internship Award
  • The Karl Kinanen Alumni Prize In Gerontology
  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Prize
  • The Audrey Evelyn Mepham Award in Gerontology
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Gerontology Prizes
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Prizes
  • The Retired Teachers of Ontario Hamilton/Haldimand District Prize In Gerontology

Some scholarships of interest:

  • The McMaster University Retirees Association Scholarship
  • The Pioneer Energy LP Scholarship
  • The Ellen Bouchard Ryan Scholarship
  • The Alvina Marie Werner Scholarship
  • The Susan Farley Scholarship
  • The Wouters Family Scholarship

The department provides academic advising (contact Lori Ewing, ewingl@mcmaster.ca, ext. 27961).  Students are given the opportunity to be involved in affiliated research centres (i.e. Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging: www.aging.mcmaster.ca; Institute for Healthier Environments: www.mcmaster.ca/mieh/, etc.) and the Health, Aging & Society Student Association (HASSA) healthagingandsociety.mcmaster.ca/copy_of_h.a.s-student-associations

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

HLTHAGE 2A03 - Research Methods in Health and in Aging I

HLTHAGE 2B03 - Social Identity, Health and Illness

HLTHAGE 2BB3 - Perspectives in Health Studies and Gerontology

HLTHAGE 2D03 - Continuum of Care

HLTHAGE 2F03 - Aging and Health Care Systems

HLTHAGE 3AA3 - State, Civil Society and Health

HLTHAGE 3L03 - Embodied Aging

 

3 units from:

HLTHAGE 3B03 - Advanced Research Inquiry

HLTHAGE 3G03 - Community Based Research

 

3 units from:

HLTHAGE 3BB3 - Field Experience

HLTHAGE 3EE3 - The Practice of Everyday Life: Observations and Inquiry

2016/2017 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health, Aging and Society, Undergraduate Program
KTH-226
905-525-9140 ext. 27227
hasdept@mcmaster.ca
Length:
3 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.5 (C-) and an average of at least 4.0 (C-) in HLTH AGE 1AA3 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course-based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
Spring

M.A.Master of Arts in Health & Aging

The M.A. in Health & Aging is an interdisciplinary study of social and cultural aspects of health and aging. Complementing an attention to key conceptual and methodological debates in the social sciences, this degree highlights a number of key research fields in the study of health and/or aging, such as: social-cultural dimensions of health and aging; systems, services and policy; and environments and health inequalities.

The M.A. program in Health & Aging allows students to advance their education and training in social scientific research practices. The program emphasizes the importance of formulating and conveying a critical analysis of contemporary issues and challenges with regard to health and/or aging.  Students are encouraged to develop an independent program of research in health studies, aging studies or at the intersection of the two areas of study.

Upon admission, students will be accepted into the one-year course work and research paper option. Students must apply for the two-year course work and thesis option during their first term of studies.

Students will have two options for completing their M.A.:

I.  M.A. 1-year Program

This option takes 12 months to complete. It features two terms of course work (six courses) and a Major Research Paper completed under the supervision of a faculty member. Students accepted into the Master's program are placed in the 1-year MA option by default.

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 2017:

Students will be required to complete six (6) half courses, including:

  1. HLTH AGE 701/Social Science Perspectives on Health and Aging

  2. ONE of: HLTH AGE 716/Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health & Aging OR HLTH AGE 714/Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health & Aging

  3. ONE of: HLTH AGE 713/Critical Perspectives on Aging OR HLTH AGE 715/Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  4. Two elective courses offered by the Department of Health, Aging & Society (HLTH AGE 713, 714, 715, 716, or any other 700-level HLTH AGE course)
  5. One elective course offered by the Department of Health, Aging & Society or by another department or academic unit (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units)

  6. A research paper (7500-8500 words, excluding references) supervised by a core or associate faculty member. The research paper will be read by the supervisor and another faculty member. If the supervisor is an associate member, then the second reader must be a core faculty member selected by the supervisor in consultation with the student.

II.  M.A. 2-year Program

Once accepted into the Master's program, students MAY APPLY for the two-year degree option that requires course work in the first year (four courses) and a thesis (in the second year) that is based on original research under the supervision of a faculty member.

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 2017:

Students will be required to complete four (4) half courses, including:

  1. HLTH AGE 701/Social Science Perspectives on Health and Aging

  2. ONE of: HLTH AGE 716/Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health & Aging OR HLTH AGE 714/Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health & Aging

  3. ONE of: HLTH AGE 713/Critical Perspectives on Aging OR HLTH AGE 715/Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  4. One elective course offered by the Department of Health, Aging & Society or by another department or academic unit (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units). 

  5. A thesis that involves original and independent research (20,000 - 25,000 words excluding references) supervised by a core faculty member or an associate member if approved by the graduate committee. The thesis will be orally examined by a committee including the supervisor and two other faculty selected by the thesis supervisor in consultation with the student.

Admission Requirements:

  • Honours Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in a related field
  • An average of B+ or better in the final two years of full-time undergraduate studies (or equivalent)
  • Strong interest in health and/or aging studies

Only COMPLETE applications will be reviewed by the Department.

NOTE:  Applicants to the MA program in Health & Aging are strongly encouraged to apply for the Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master's 2017-18 Competition (Scholarship Competition Deadline: December 1), provided they meet the eligibility requirements.  For more information, visit the School of Graduate Studies: Awards & Funding

Required Application Documents:

Graduate Studies Online Application

  • Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year.

  • In addition to the online application, applicants must also submit the required documents listed below.

  • NOTE: Some required application documents must be submitted through your online application (see below for details). 

Official Academic Transcripts

  • Academic transcripts for ALL post-secondary studies completed or in progress at the time of application
  • Transcripts from institutions where you completed courses on Letter of Permission and/or as part of Student Exchange Programs must also be included
  • Transcripts must be submitted in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned transcripts uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official transcripts in a sealed envelope, signed/stamped by the issuing institution, and sent from the issuing institution DIRECTLY to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below)

Academic References

  • Two (2) confidential reference reports from instructors most familiar with your academic work
  • McMaster University uses an Electronic Referencing System (e-Reference).  By entering the email address of your reference through your online application, the system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf
  • IMPORTANT: The system will send the e-Reference request to your references ONLY AFTER YOU SUBMIT your online application. This means that you will need to have completed AND uploaded your scanned transcripts, Statement of Interest, Writing Sample, and CV/resume to your online application BEFORE you can click “Submit”. References may require 3-4 weeks to complete a reference report. References MUST complete their reference report BY THE APPLICATION DEADLINE OF FEBRUARY 15. Please keep this in mind when you are working on your application.
  • If, for some reason, you are unable to use the Electronic Referencing System, you can download the Reference Form and send to your references for completion.  Downloaded reference forms must be sent by the reference DIRECTLY to Kristine Espiritu by e-mail (espirit@mcmaster.ca) or to the mailing address below.

Statement of Interest

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application
  • Maximum 2 pages, double-spaced
  • References page(s) should be single-spaced and do not count towards the maximum 2-page limit
  • Your Statement of Interest should clearly communicate:
    • Your specific research interests and focus
    • The relevance of your specific research to health and/or aging studies
    • The approach/methods used to tackle your research problem
    • Your academic preparedness to undertake and complete your research, and predicted training outcomes

Sample of Writing

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

Resumé/CV

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

English Language Proficiency (if applicable)

  • If English is not your native language, an official copy of your English Language Proficiency score or other evidence of competency in English is required.  Applicants whose university studies were completed at an institution where English is deemed the official language of instruction may be exempted from this requirement (official letter from the institution is required)
  • The English Language Proficiency exam must have been completed within 2 years of the application due date
  • The most common English Language Proficiency exams:
    • TOEFL: minimum score of 92 (internet based), 237 (computer based) or 580 (paper based), minimum of 20 per band. Please use TOEFL department code 080 (Other Social Sciences).
    • IELTS (Academic): minimum overall score of 6.5, with at least 5.5 in each section
  • Other English Language Proficiency exams may be accepted. Please visit the School of Graduate Studies: How to Apply web site and click “Language Requirements” for more information
  • Submit English Language Proficiency exam results in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned copy of your English Language Proficiency exam results uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official English Language Proficiency exam results sent DIRECTLY from the issuing institution to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below)

How to Apply:

Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year and submit the required application documents listed above to complete the application.

Please send all (hard copy) supporting documents to:

Department of Health, Aging & Society
c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, ON L8S 4M4
Canada

Application Deadline:

  • February 15

The majority of Health, Aging & Society graduate students at McMaster receives competitive funding packages that may include financial support such as teaching assistantships, university graduate scholarships, as well as external scholarships and bursaries.

For information about major scholarships and awards competitions, please visit School of Graduate Studies: Awards & Funding  

The awards listed below are open to CURRENT McMaster University graduate students who meet the eligibility requirements.  Eligible students should apply through Mosaic and submit the required documents specified in the application. Note the application deadline indicated on Mosaic each academic year.

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award was established in 1999 by Barbara Bayne to honor Dr. Ronald Bayne's valuable contribution to the study of Gerontology at McMaster University.  This scholarship is to be awarded to any GRADUATE STUDENT in the FACULTIES OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF AGING.

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship was established in 1997 using funds raised by a performance of the play "Letter from Wingfield Farm".  This scholarship is to be awarded to in-course GRADUATE STUDENTS from the FACULTIES OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HEALTH SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH ON AGING.

Faculty Supervisor

  • All Health, Aging & Society graduate students should discuss course selection, MRP/thesis, and any other academic related questions with their supervisor.

Graduate Chair

  • The department’s graduate chair is also available to provide additional support to Health, Aging & Society graduate students

MA in Health & Aging Handbook 

All HLTH AGE graduate courses are one-term (3-unit) courses and are offered for graduate credit. Note: Not all courses are offered in a given year.  Please consult the Department of Health, Aging & Society for current offerings.

  • HLTH AGE 701 / Social Science Perspectives on Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 703 / Social Systems, Services and Policy: Critical Perspectives
  • HLTH AGE 704 / Special Topics in Aging
  • HLTH AGE 705 / Special Topics in Health
  • HLTH AGE 706 / Independent Study
  • HLTH AGE 708 / Health and Aging in a Global and International Context
  • HLTH AGE 709 / Socio-Cultural Aspects of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 710 / Health, Aging and the Media
  • HLTH AGE 711 / The Health Care System and the Older Person
  • HLTH AGE 712 / Globalization and Health
  • HLTH AGE 713 / Critical Perspectives on Aging
  • HLTH AGE 714 / Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 715 / Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  • HLTH AGE 716 / Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
School of Graduate Studies Graduate Calendar Graduate Supervisors Paying Your Fees MA in Health & Aging Handbook Apply Now
For more information:
Department of Health, Aging & Society c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
(905) 525-9140, ext. 27035
espirit@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 year: Course Work plus Major Research Paper OR 2 years: Course Work plus Thesis
Required Credential:
Honours Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in a related field
Program Type:
Course Work plus Major Research Paper; Course Work plus Thesis
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
February 15

Ph.D.Doctor of Philosophy in Health Studies

The Ph.D. in Health Studies is an interdisciplinary study of social, cultural, political, and environmental aspects of health. The program allows students to take a critical, interdisciplinary, and social science perspective in the study of health, illness, and health care. Areas of research include: critical health studies; environments and health inequalities; systems, services and policy; and global health. NOTE: The Department of Health, Aging & Society is in the process of recommending a degree name change from PhD in Health Studies to PhD in Health & Society, subject to required approvals. Please visit the Department web site regularly for updates.

The Ph.D. program in Health Studies applies an interdisciplinary, comparative, and critical lens to analyzing and understanding health as a social and cultural process, construct, and outcome.  It is the combination of these three perspectives, the ways that they interact with and build on one another, and a focus on both the social structural and cultural dimensions of health that makes the program distinctive in its area. The PhD program in Health Studies differs from many doctoral programs in this area in that it allows students to develop and pursue broader research interests that may be outside the typical focus on public health, demography and service management.  Students completing the PhD in Health Studies will have theoretical and methodological expertise in integrating knowledge and critical approaches to research from a broad range of disciplines in the social sciences.

NOTE:  The Department of Health, Aging & Society is in the process of recommending a degree name change from PhD in Health Studies to PhD in Health & Society, subject to required approvals.  Please visit the Department web site regularly for updates.

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 2017:

Students will be required to complete five (5) half courses, which include:

  1. HLTH AGE 716 Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health and Aging, and HLTH AGE 714 Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
  2. HLTH AGE 715 Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  3. Two elective courses offered by Health, Aging & Society (HLTH AGE 701, 713, or any other 700-level HLTH AGE course) OR by another department or academic unit (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units).

Additional Information

  1. Students entering the PhD program who have already taken any of the following courses: HLTH AGE 714, 715, and 716, or their graduate level equivalent from another program/university, can apply for exemption through the Department of Health, Aging & Society.
  2. Students who have been granted exemption for ALL THREE required courses stated above (or their graduate level equivalent) must complete a minimum of 3 half courses to fulfill the course requirements of the program. One of the three courses must be a HLTH AGE course. The other two courses may be HLTH AGE courses or courses from a department or academic unit other than Health, Aging & Society (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units).  Course selection should be discussed with the supervisor.
  3. Students who have been granted exemption for LESS THAN 3 required HLTH AGE courses (or their graduate level equivalent) must complete a minimum of 5 half courses to fulfill the course requirements of the program. One of the exempted courses must be replaced with a HLTH AGE course. Additional exempted courses may be replaced with other HLTH AGE courses or courses from a department or academic unit other than Health, Aging & Society (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units). Course selection should be discussed with the supervisor.
  4. All doctoral students will be required to participate in a non-credit research and professional development seminar over the course of two academic years. Participation in the seminar will normally take place in the first and second year of the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students will take a comprehensive exam in their area of concentration in Health Studies. The purpose of the exam is to ensure that the student has sufficient knowledge of the relevant scholarly literature in her/his area of research interest and that she/he is able to synthesize and communicate this literature in a critically insightful way. The comprehensive exam will consist of a written examination, an oral examination, and a research proposal (which is also evaluated during the oral examination).

Thesis

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree will present a thesis which shows competence in original research and will be required to defend it during a final oral examination.

Admission Requirements:

  • Master’s degree with an average of at least B+ in a related health and/or social sciences discipline
  • Demonstrated interest and experience in critical approaches to health
  • Admission to the PhD program will normally be on a full-time basis only

Applicants will be assessed on the basis of their qualifications and how well their interests align with the research interests and availability of faculty.  Only COMPLETE applications will be reviewed by the Department.

NOTE:  During the application process, applicants are encouraged to contact faculty members in the Department regarding potential PhD supervision as well as the PhD program.

Required Application Documents:

Graduate Studies Online Application

  • Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year.

  • In addition to the online application, applicants must also submit the required documents listed below.

  • NOTE: Some required application documents must be submitted through your online application (see below for details).

Official Academic Transcripts

  • Academic transcripts for ALL post-secondary studies completed or in progress at the time of application
  • Transcripts from institutions where you completed courses on Letter of Permission and/or as part of Student Exchange Programs must also be included
  • Transcripts must be submitted in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned transcripts uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official transcripts in a sealed envelope, signed/stamped by the issuing institution, and sent from the issuing institution DIRECTLY to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below)

Academic References:

  • Two (2) confidential reference reports from instructors most familiar with your academic work
  • McMaster University uses an Electronic Referencing System (e-Reference).  By entering the email address of your reference through your online application, the system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf
  • IMPORTANT: The system will send the e-Reference request to your references ONLY AFTER YOU SUBMIT your online application. This means that you will need to have completed AND uploaded your scanned transcripts, Statement of Interest, Writing Sample, and CV/resume to your online application BEFORE you can click “Submit”. References may require 3-4 weeks to complete a reference report. References MUST complete their reference report BY THE APPLICATION DEADLINE OF FEBRUARY 15. Please keep this in mind when you are working on your application.
  • If, for some reason, you are unable to use the Electronic Referencing System, you can download the Reference Form  and send to your references for completion.  Downloaded reference forms must be sent by the reference DIRECTLY to Kristine Espiritu by e-mail (espirit@mcmaster.ca) or to the mailing address below. 

Statement of Interest

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application
  • Maximum 3-4 pages, double-spaced
  • References page(s) should be single-spaced and do not count towards the maximum 3-4-page limit
  • Your Statement of Interest should clearly communicate:
    • Your specific research interests and focus
    • The relevance of your specific research to health studies
    • The approach/methods used to tackle your research problem

Sample of Writing

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

Resumé/CV

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

English Language Proficiency (if applicable)

  • If English is not your native language, an official copy of your English Language Proficiency score or other evidence of competency in English is required.  Applicants whose university studies were completed at an institution where English is deemed the official language of instruction may be exempted from this requirement (official letter from the institution is required)
  • The English Language Proficiency exam must have been completed within 2 years of the application due date
  • The most common English Language Proficiency exams:
    • TOEFL: minimum score of 92 (internet based), 237 (computer based) or 580 (paper based), minimum of 20 per band. Please use TOEFL department code 080 (Other Social Sciences).
    • IELTS (Academic): minimum overall score of 6.5, with at least 5.5 in each section
  • Other English Language Proficiency exams may be accepted. Please visit the School of Graduate Studies: How to Apply and click “Language Requirements” for more information
  • Submit English Language Proficiency exam results in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned copy of your English Language Proficiency exam results uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official English Language Proficiency exam results sent DIRECTLY from the issuing institution to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below) 

How to Apply:

Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year and submit the required application documents listed above to complete the application.

Please send all (hard copy) supporting documents to:

Department of Health, Aging & Society
c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, ON L8S 4M4
Canada

Application Deadline:

  • February 15

The majority of Health, Aging & Society graduate students at McMaster receives competitive funding packages that may include financial support such as teaching assistantships, university graduate scholarships, as well as external scholarships and bursaries.

For information about major scholarships and awards competitions, please visit School of Graduate Studies: Awards & Funding.

The awards listed below are open to CURRENT McMaster University graduate students who meet the eligibility requirements.  Eligible students should apply through Mosaic and submit the required documents specified in the application. Note the application deadline indicated on Mosaic each academic year.

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award was established in 1999 by Barbara Bayne to honor Dr. Ronald Bayne's valuable contribution to the study of Gerontology at McMaster University.  This scholarship is to be awarded to any GRADUATE STUDENT in the FACULTIES OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF AGING. 

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship was established in 1997 using funds raised by a performance of the play "Letter from Wingfield Farm".  This scholarship is to be awarded to in-course GRADUATE STUDENTS from the FACULTIES OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HEALTH SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH ON AGING.

 

Faculty Supervisor

  • All Health, Aging & Society graduate students should discuss course selection, comprehensive exam, thesis, and any other academic related questions with their supervisor.

Graduate Chair

  • The department’s graduate chair is also available to provide additional support to Health, Aging & Society graduate students

PhD in Health Studies Handbook 

All HLTH AGE graduate courses are one-term (3-unit) courses and are offered for graduate credit. NOTE: Not all courses are offered in a given year. Please consult the Department of Health, Aging & Society for current offerings.

  • HLTH AGE 701 / Social Science Perspectives on Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 703 / Social Systems, Services and Policy: Critical Perspectives
  • HLTH AGE 704 / Special Topics in Aging
  • HLTH AGE 705 / Special Topics in Health
  • HLTH AGE 706 / Independent Study
  • HLTH AGE 708 / Health and Aging in a Global and International Context
  • HLTH AGE 709 / Socio-Cultural Aspects of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 710 / Health, Aging and the Media
  • HLTH AGE 711 / The Health Care System and the Older Person
  • HLTH AGE 712 / Globalization and Health
  • HLTH AGE 713 / Critical Perspectives on Aging
  • HLTH AGE 714 / Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 715 / Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  • HLTH AGE 716 / Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
School of Graduate Studies Graduate Calendar Graduate Supervisors Paying Your Fees PhD Health Studies Handbook Apply Now
For more information:
Department of Health, Aging & Society c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
(905) 525-9140, ext. 27035
espirit@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Master’s degree in a related health and/or social sciences discipline
Program Type:
Doctoral
Program Options:
Full-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
February 15

Ph.D.Doctor of Philosophy in Social Gerontology

The PhD in Social Gerontology is an interdisciplinary study of social, cultural, and political aspects of aging. The program allows students to take a critical social science perspective and an interdisciplinary approach to the study of aging. Areas of research include: health and social care; critical gerontology; systems, services and policy; diversity; and cumulative inequalities.

The PhD program in Social Gerontology will apply an interdisciplinary, comparative, and critical lens to analyzing and understanding aging as a social and cultural process, construct, and outcome.  It is the combination of these three perspectives, the ways that they interact with and build on one another, and a focus on both the social structural and cultural dimensions of aging that makes the program distinctive in its area. The PhD program in Social Gerontology differs from many doctoral programs in this area in that it allows students to develop and pursue broader research interests that may be outside the typical focus on functional health, demography and service management.  Students who complete the PhD in Social Gerontology will acquire theoretical and methodological expertise in social gerontology with a specific emphasis on an interdisciplinary social science perspective on aging and the condition of later age.

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 2017:

Students will be required to complete five (5) half courses, which include:

  1. HLTH AGE 716 Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health and Aging, and HLTH AGE 714 Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
  2. HLTH AGE 713 Critical Perspectives on Aging
  3. Two elective courses offered by Health, Aging & Society (HLTH AGE 701, 715, or any other 700-level HLTH AGE course) OR by another department or academic unit (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units).

Additional Information

  1. Students entering the PhD program who have already taken any of the following courses: HLTH AGE 714, 713, and 716, or their graduate level equivalent from another program/university, can apply for exemption through the Department of Health, Aging & Society.
  2. Students who have been granted exemption for ALL THREE required courses stated above (or their graduate level equivalent) must complete a minimum of 3 half courses to fulfill the course requirements of the program. One of the three courses must be a HLTH AGE course. The other two courses may be HLTH AGE courses or courses from a department or academic unit other than Health, Aging & Society (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units). Course selection should be discussed with the supervisor.
  3. Students who have been granted exemption for LESS THAN 3 required HLTH AGE courses (or their graduate level equivalent) must complete a minimum of 5 half courses to fulfill the course requirements of the program. One of the exempted courses must be replaced with a HLTH AGE course. Additional exempted courses may be replaced with other HLTH AGE courses or courses from a department or academic other than Health, Aging & Society (provided that permission has been obtained from those departments or academic units). Course selection should be discussed with the supervisor.
  4. All doctoral students will be required to participate in a non-credit research and professional development seminar over the course of two academic years.  Participation in the seminar will normally take place in the first and second year of the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students will take a comprehensive exam in their area of concentration in Social Gerontology. The purpose of the exam is to ensure that the student has sufficient knowledge of the relevant scholarly literature in her/his area of research interest and that she/he is able to synthesize and communicate this literature in a critically insightful way. The comprehensive exam will consist of a written examination, an oral examination, and a research proposal (which is also evaluated during the oral examination).

Thesis

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree will present a thesis which shows competence in original research and will be required to defend it during a final oral examination.

Admission Requirements:

  • Master’s degree with an average of at least B+ in a related aging and/or social sciences discipline
  • Demonstrated interest and experience in critical approaches to aging
  • Admission to the PhD program will normally be on a full-time basis only

Applicants will be assessed on the basis of their qualifications and how well their interests align with the research interests and availability of faculty.  Only COMPLETE applications will be reviewed by the Department.

NOTE:  During the application process, applicants are encouraged to contact faculty members in the Department regarding potential PhD supervision as well as the PhD program.

Required Application Documents:

Graduate Studies Online Application

  • Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year.  
  • In addition to the online application, applicants must also submit the required documents listed below.
  • NOTE: Some required application documents must be submitted through your online application (see below for details).

Official Academic Transcripts

  • Academic transcripts for ALL post-secondary studies completed or in progress at the time of application
  • Transcripts from institutions where you completed courses on Letter of Permission and/or as part of Student Exchange Programs must also be included
  • Transcripts must be submitted in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned transcripts uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official transcripts in a sealed envelope, signed/stamped by the issuing institution, and sent from the issuing institution DIRECTLY to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below)

Academic References

  • Two (2) confidential reference reports from instructors most familiar with your academic work
  • McMaster University uses an Electronic Referencing System (e-Reference).  By entering the email address of your reference through your online application, the system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf
  • IMPORTANT: The system will send the e-Reference request to your references ONLY AFTER YOU SUBMIT your online application. This means that you will need to have completed AND uploaded your scanned transcripts, Statement of Interest, Writing Sample, and CV/resume to your online application BEFORE you can click “Submit”. References may require 3-4 weeks to complete a reference report. References MUST complete their reference report BY THE APPLICATION DEADLINE OF FEBRUARY 15. Please keep this in mind when you are working on your application.
  • If, for some reason, you are unable to use the Electronic Referencing System, you can download the Reference Form and send to your references for completion.  Downloaded reference forms must be sent by the reference DIRECTLY to Kristine Espiritu by e-mail (espirit@mcmaster.ca) or to the mailing address below.

Statement of Interest

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application
  • Maximum 3-4 pages, double-spaced
  • References page(s) should be single-spaced and do not count towards the maximum 3-4-page limit
  • Your Statement of Interest should clearly communicate:
    • Your specific research interests and focus
    • The relevance of your specific research to aging studies
    • The approach/methods used to tackle your research problem

Sample of Writing

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

Resumé/CV

  • Must be uploaded as a PDF document through your online application

English Language Proficiency (if applicable)

  • If English is not your native language, an official copy of your English Language Proficiency score or other evidence of competency in English is required.  Applicants whose university studies were completed at an institution where English is deemed the official language of instruction may be exempted from this requirement (official letter from the institution is required)
  • The English Language Proficiency exam must have been completed within 2 years of the application due date
  • The most common English Language Proficiency exams:
    • TOEFL: minimum score of 92 (internet based), 237 (computer based) or 580 (paper based), minimum of 20 per band. Please use TOEFL department code 080 (Other Social Sciences).
    • IELTS (Academic): minimum overall score of 6.5, with at least 5.5 in each section
  • Other English Language Proficiency exams may be accepted. Please visit the School of Graduate Studies: How to Apply web site and click “Language Requirements” for more information
  • Submit English Language Proficiency exam results in TWO different formats:
    • Electronic:  Scanned copy of your English Language Proficiency exam results uploaded through your online application
    • Paper:  Official English Language Proficiency exam results sent DIRECTLY from the issuing institution to the Department of Health, Aging & Society (mailing address below)

How to Apply:

Each applicant is required to complete the Graduate Studies Online Application which opens in November each year and submit the required application documents listed above to complete the application.

Please send all (hard copy) supporting documents to:

Department of Health, Aging & Society
c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, ON L8S 4M4
Canada

Application Deadline:

  • February 15

The majority of Health, Aging & Society graduate students at McMaster receives competitive funding packages that may include financial support such as teaching assistantships, university graduate scholarships, as well as external scholarships and bursaries.

For information about major scholarships and awards competitions, please visit School of Graduate Studies: Awards & Funding.

The awards listed below are open to CURRENT McMaster University graduate students who meet the eligibility requirements.  Eligible students should apply through Mosaic and submit the required documents specified in the application. Note the application deadline indicated on Mosaic each academic year.

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award

The Ronald Bayne Gerontology Award was established in 1999 by Barbara Bayne to honor Dr. Ronald Bayne's valuable contribution to the study of Gerontology at McMaster University.  This scholarship is to be awarded to any GRADUATE STUDENT in the FACULTIES OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF AGING.

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship

The E.B. Ryan Scholarship was established in 1997 using funds raised by a performance of the play "Letter from Wingfield Farm".  This scholarship is to be awarded to in-course GRADUATE STUDENTS from the FACULTIES OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HEALTH SCIENCES conducting RESEARCH ON AGING.

Faculty Supervisor

All Health, Aging & Society graduate students should discuss course selection, comprehensive exam, thesis, and any other academic related questions with their supervisor.

Graduate Chair

The department’s graduate chair is also available to provide additional support to Health, Aging & Society graduate students

PhD in Social Gerontology Handbook

 

All HLTH AGE graduate courses are one-term (3-unit) courses and are offered for graduate credit. NOTE: Not all courses are offered in a given year. Please consult the department for current offerings.

  • HLTH AGE 701 / Social Science Perspectives on Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 703 / Social Systems, Services and Policy: Critical Perspectives
  • HLTH AGE 704 / Special Topics in Aging
  • HLTH AGE 705 / Special Topics in Health
  • HLTH AGE 706 / Independent Study
  • HLTH AGE 708 / Health and Aging in a Global and International Context
  • HLTH AGE 709 / Socio-Cultural Aspects of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 710 / Health, Aging and the Media
  • HLTH AGE 711 / The Health Care System and the Older Person
  • HLTH AGE 712 / Globalization and Health
  • HLTH AGE 713 / Critical Perspectives on Aging
  • HLTH AGE 714 / Qualitative and Historical Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
  • HLTH AGE 715 / Critical Perspectives in Health Studies
  • HLTH AGE 716 / Quantitative Research Methods in Studies of Health and Aging
School of Graduate Studies Graduate Calendar Graduate Supervisors Paying Your Fees PhD Social Gerontology Handbook Apply Now
For more information:
Department of Health, Aging & Society c/o Kristine Espiritu
Kenneth Taylor Hall 226
(905) 525-9140, ext. 27035
espirit@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Master’s degree in a related aging and/or social sciences discipline
Program Type:
Doctoral
Program Options:
Full-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
February 15